1 Apr

July 21st, 2016 – Guest speaker: Andrea Pauli, IMP Vienna

Andrea-PauliMark your calendar! On July 21st, Andrea Pauli from the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna, Austria, will visit the University of Regensburg. Her major research interest is the function of short open reading frames in zebrafish development.

Recent findings have indicated that eukaryotic translation is far more complex than anticipated with the frequent translation of short open reading frames that were previously overlooked. This ‘pervasive translation’ includes regions that are predicted to encode short, conserved proteins, while other translated regions lack signatures of protein conservation and might serve gene-regulatory functions. This raises two important questions: what is the role of the translated regions in the regulation of gene expression, and what are the functions of the newly discovered short proteins/petides? In her talk entitled ‘Found in translation: from genomics to novel gene functions in zebrafish’ (2p.m. in H53), Andrea will share exciting insights into the functions and regulatory principles of these newly discovered short translated open reading frames (ORFs) employing zebrafish embryogenesis as a model system.

Andrea-Pauli-primer

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31 Mar

Review article: The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins

Soon a special issue with focus on ‘RNA biology in physiology and disease’ will be published by the European Journal of Physiology (Pflügers Archiv). Together with our colleagues Benedikt Beckmann (IRI for the Life Sciences, Humboldt University Berlin) and Alfredo Castello (University of Oxford) we have contributed a review article entitled: The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins – of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

We focus on the recent advances in the identification of novel RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and the unexpected finding that many of the novel RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. It is surprising that despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (‘RNA-determined RNPs’) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of ‘classical’ RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins (which we discuss in detail in the review article).

HCV-on-40SHCV IRES bound to a 40S ribosomal subunit, structure based on Yamamoto et al., 2015; PDB ID: 5FLX, individual panels represent different orientations (rotated by 90°).

11 Mar

Nobel laureate Randy Schekman talks about unconventional secretion of protein and RNA

Photos courtsey of Andreas FuchsStudents of the Regensburg International Graduate School for Life Sciences (RIGeL) invited Randy Schekman (UC Berkeley) for an honorary lecture to Regensburg. In 2013, together with his colleagues James Rothmann (Yale University) and Thomas Südhof (Stanford University), Randy received the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his groundbreaking work on cellular trafficking. It was an exciting event with great science and lots of fun! (Photos courtsey of Andreas Fuchs)

7 Mar

Meeting of the DFG Research Unit 2333 ‘Macromolecular complexes in mRNA localization’ (FOR2333)

FOR2333LogoThe first meeting of the DFG Research Unit 2333 (FOR2333) took place on March 1st and 2nd in the beautiful town of Blaubeuren, famous for its resurgence the ‘Blautopf’ that feeds the Danube river.  FOR2333 receives funding from the DFG since beginning of 2016 to foster multidisciplinary research aiming to understand principles of gene regulation by directional mRNA transport and local translation. Unfortunately our application to become part of this exciting research team was not successful but nonetheless we were invited to participate in this wonderful meeting packed with talks about exciting research and novel findings. We are extremely happy for this opportunity and we are looking forward to continuing our collaborations with several groups of the consortium.

FOR Meeting(Photo courtsey of Dierk Niessing)

 

7 Jan

New colleague in the lab: Andreas Horn

AndreasThe new year has just started and already there are some great news: Andreas Horn joined the lab as a PhD student! His PhD project will focus on a novel strategy that we have recently developed which allows to map protein-RNA interaction with high resolution in a parallel fashion. Welcome to the lab!

17 Dec

Season’s Greetings

Lab-Christmas-2015With christmas time approaching, we would like to thank our colleagues and collaborators for a wonderful and productive year! Also we would like to specifically thank the funding agencies for their very generous support that helps us to pursue our scientific goals!

Merry Christmas, a relaxing holiday season and a happy and successful New Year!

16 Dec

Fellowship for Stefan Reich

JHS_Logo_RGBWe are very happy to announce that Stefan Reich was awarded a fellowship from the Joachim Herz Stiftung!

‘I am very happy that my application for an Add-on Fellowship for Interdisciplinary Science from the Joachim Herz Stiftung was successful. This now gives me the opportunity to attend conferences and additional courses in bioinformatics which will support our work. Personally, I hope to gain further insight into data analysis which will pave the way to success in my doctoral thesis. For this reason I want to thank the Joachim Herz Stiftung very much for the generous support and I am looking forward to the first meeting with the other fellows in March 2016.’

-Stefan Reich, PhD student

6 Oct

November 3rd, 2015 – Guest speaker: Dr. Fillip Port – CANCELED

Fillip-PortWe are very much looking forward to a visit from Dr. Fillip Port from the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the MRC in Cambridge. Leading the CRISPR project in the lab of Simon Bullock, Fillip has pioneered the use of the Cas9 endonuclease in genomic engineering of Drosophila. This technique now allows the introduction of mutations at single nucleotide resolution and to integrate exogenous sequences at predefined loci. Today a Drosophila toolbox is available that consists of transgenic cas9 strains and versatile gRNA expression plasmids for various applications, including germ line mutagenesis, precise knock-ins and tissue specific genetic screens. Further information about this can be found on the CRISPR fly design webpage and in the Blog.

In his talk Fillip will  present how he is using CRISPR/cas-mediated genome engineering to gain novel insights into the mechanism and functional relevance of mRNA localisation in the nervous system. Feel free to join us for some exciting science on November 3rd at 5p.m. in H53!

wingdisc